The Veteran's Post-9/11 GI Bill


In addition to helping with mortgages for veterans, we want to keep vets informed of other information that can help them with their finances. The GI Bill is one benefit that veterans may not be aware of, which can assist them in acquiring new job skills.

The Post-9/11 GI Bill law was passed in 2008 to provide military veterans on active duty after September 10, 2001, with certain benefits. In keeping with the original GI Bill of 1944 which was created to provide benefits to the veterans of WWI and the Montgomery GI Bill of 1984, the Post-9/11 GI Bill represents a continued effort by the U.S. government to provide veterans returning from active duty after 2001 with benefits. The original GI Bill was created in 1944 in response to protests during the Great Depression due to the government’s failure to provide veterans returning from WWI with benefits.


Eligibility for Post-9/11 GI Bill Benefits

To be eligible, an applicant must be an active service member and served for a minimum period of 90 aggregate days or have been discharged for a disability related to service after 30 days of continuous service.

Service members may be eligible for benefits after the date of Sept. 10, 2001 if:

  • They have been on active duty for a minimum of 90 aggregate days after the cutoff date; or
  • They received an honorable discharge from active service for disability related to active duty after 30 days of continuous service following the cut-off date.
  • Dependent children of a member of the Armed Forces who died after the cut-off date may be eligible for benefits under a special Scholarship Program.

What Does the Post-9/11 GI Bill Cover?

The bill provides service members with funding training and tuition assistance. Up to 3 years of benefits are provided that can be used up to 15 years after a veteran has qualified. An update to the bill expands eligibility to National Guard, Active Guard, and Reserve Guard members. There are several facets to the Post-9/11 GI Bill that includes:

  • Tuition and fee coverage up to 100% of the national average.
  • Monthly housing allowance depending on the location of the school.
  • A one-off relocation allowance.
  • Up to $1,000 per year for books and supplies.
  • An option to transfer the benefits to family members. (A qualifying service member may transfer a portion or all 3 years of their Post-9/11 GI benefits to a child or a spouse subject to approval by the Department of Defense.)
  • Partial support for attendance at private or out-of-state universities under the Yellow Ribbon Program.

Benefit Tiers of Payment

All benefit payments are based on the creditable amount of active-duty service a veteran had since September 10, 2001. A percentage of benefits will be applied as follows:

  • 36 months of accumulative service (includes Entry Level and Skills Training time) – 100%
  • Discharge due to service-related disability after 30 continuous days of active duty (includes Entry Level and Skills Training time) – 100%
  • 30 months of cumulative active service (includes Entry Level and Skills Training time) – 90%
  • 24 months of cumulative active service (includes Entry Level and Skills Training time) – 80%
  • 18 months of cumulative active service (does not include Entry Level and Skills Training time) – 70%
  • 12 months of cumulative active service (does not include Entry Level and Skills Training time) – 60%
  • 6 months of cumulative active service (does not include Entry Level and Skills Training time) – 50%
  • 90 aggregate days (does not include Skills Training and Entry Level time) – 40%

Once you have qualified for education benefits you do not need to remain enrolled in a school for the entire 36 months of benefits. You can use your benefits over a period of time, take time off, and re-apply at a later date as long as it is within the period of 15 years. You can also use it to reach your education goals like working on a bachelor’s degree, completing a master’s degree, or completing your associates.


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